Hasenfus' Capture

American Is Captured After Plane Is Downed in Nicaragua Territory

WASHINGTON, Oct. 7 - An American-built cargo plane that was shot down over southern Nicaragua on Sunday was operated by a private group led by a retired United States Army major general Reagan Administration officials said today.The officials said the plane was operated by an organization headed by the retired general, John K. Singlaub, and had taken off from El Salvador. It had flown down the Pacific coast of Nicaragua and turned inland to deliver ammunition and supplies to rebels seeking to open a southern front against the Sandinista Government in Managua.Spokesmen for the Administration, the State Department, the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Defense all emphatically denied that the flight was in any way connected with the United States Government

C.I.A. Denies a Role-Aides Point to PrivateRightist Organization

WASHINGTON, Oct. 8 - President Reagan strongly suggested today that he approved of efforts by private American citizens to help Nicaraguan insurgents fighting the Sandinista Government, including those Americans who sent in a cargo plane that was shot down on Sunday.But Administration officials disclosed that the Federal Bureau of Investigation had opened what was described as a "preliminary investigation" of those private activities as possible violation of American neutrality laws.Even so, President Reagan compared the efforts of private citizens at this time to those of Americans who joined the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in the 1930's to fight alongside Spanish Republican soldiers against Franco and his rightist Insurgents.

The 1954 model, C-123 paratroop/cargo plane, provided by the CIA and Ollie North for the Contra/Sandinista 1980's guerilla war in Nicaragua, in the San Jose airport before disassembly.

C-123 K Provider
The 1954 model, C-123 paratroop/cargo plane, provided by the CIA and Ollie North for the Contra/Sandinista 1980's guerilla war in Nicaragua, in the San Jose airport before disassembly.

The time-worn cockpit; detaching the wings and the start of the take-apart job

The time-worn cockpit; detaching the wings and the start of the take-apart job.

Removal of the tail and wings begins...

Removal of the tail and wings begins...

The wings are lifted off the fuselage, which is shortly to be a cut in half.

The wings are lifted off the fuselage, which is shortly to be a cut in half.

Towing the plane to Port Caldera, the nearest sea port to the international airport

Towing the plane to Port Caldera, the nearest sea port to the international airport.

After loading the C-123 on to the ferry, we hit the high seas; arrival at Port Quepos.

After loading the C-123 on to the ferry, we hit the high seas; arrival at Port Quepos.

The fuselage being unloaded at Port Quepos.

Winding our way through downtown Quepos...

The fuselage being unloaded at Port Quepos.

Winding our way through downtown Quepos...

Arrival in Manuel Antonio and the start of reconstruction.

Putting the finishing touches on 'Ollie's Folly'; the C-123 finds its final resting place on a hill 300 meters above the hotel reception

Putting the finishing touches on “Ollie's Folly”
the C-123 finds its final resting place on a hill 300 meters
above the hotel reception.